Iceland's Northern Lights: Beautiful sight, risky drives

AKUREYRI, Iceland — Police in Iceland have a warning for visitors: Beware our roads in the winter.
Spending a clear winter night under an Arctic sky lit up by spectacular streaks of colour from the Northern Lights is an often-cited “bucket-list” experience that’s among the reasons more people are visiting Iceland.
But police say many foreign visitors lack the experience and expertise to handle Iceland’s wintry road conditions. They are increasingly worried about visitors scanning the sky for the Northern Lights and not looking at the road, which may be icy, twisty, narrow — or all three at once.
Of the 18 people who died in traffic crashes in Iceland in 2018, half of them were foreigners.
Johannes Sigfusson of the Akureyri Police Department says “the weather in Iceland changes every five minutes.”
Egill Bjarnason, The Associated Press

AKUREYRI, Iceland — Police in Iceland have a warning for visitors: Beware our roads in the winter.

Spending a clear winter night under an Arctic sky lit up by spectacular streaks of colour from the Northern Lights is an often-cited “bucket-list” experience that’s among the reasons more people are visiting Iceland.

But police say many foreign visitors lack the experience and expertise to handle Iceland’s wintry road conditions. They are increasingly worried about visitors scanning the sky for the Northern Lights and not looking at the road, which may be icy, twisty, narrow — or all three at once.

Of the 18 people who died in traffic crashes in Iceland in 2018, half of them were foreigners.

Johannes Sigfusson of the Akureyri Police Department says “the weather in Iceland changes every five minutes.”

Egill Bjarnason, The Associated Press