Placing Spire Healthcare Group plc (LSE:SPI)'s Quant Signals Under the Lens at


Spire Healthcare Group plc (LSE:SPI) has a Q.i. Value of 22.00000. The purpose of the Q.i. Value is to help identify companies that are the most undervalued. Typically, the lower the value, the more undervalued the company tends to be. The Q.i. Value ranks companies using four ratios. These ratios consist of EBITDA Yield, FCF Yield, Liquidity, and Earnings Yield. 

Investors might have been ready to throw in the towel as the rally stalled recently. However, the panic subsided and growth-hungry investors came searching for their favorite stocks in the wreckage. Keeping things in perspective, the economy seems good, and so does earnings growth. Investors may be wondering where the money will be flowing in the second half of the year. Many people may assume healthcare and tech would be the easy targets, primarily because that’s where the earnings growth is. Industrials and staples are no slouches for growth either, but they may be well fully-valued for their growth. Traders will most likely be honing their strategies that they created, trying to beat the market over the next couple of months.

Checking in on some valuation rankings, Spire Healthcare Group plc (LSE:SPI) has a Value Composite score of 9. Developed by James O’Shaughnessy, the VC score uses five valuation ratios. These ratios are price to earnings, price to cash flow, EBITDA to EV, price to book value, and price to sales. The VC is displayed as a number between 1 and 100. In general, a company with a score closer to 0 would be seen as undervalued, and a score closer to 100 would indicate an overvalued company. Adding a sixth ratio, shareholder yield, we can view the Value Composite 2 score which is currently sitting at 7.

A certain stock price rally by itself may not be sufficient evidence when making important investing decisions. To understand whether buying a stock at a higher price is justified by its long-term return potential, it is necessary to keep the finger on the pulse of underlying fundamentals. Following the latest data may help investors make the tough portfolio decisions. Investors may also want to set personal financial goals to help ensure that they are staying on the proper track. Financial professionals may be debating if global economic growth appears to be in a modest uptrend. This may have investors scrambling to study if developing markets are indeed growing with developed markets. This year could end up being the first year in a while where this has happened. The longer the bull market run, the tougher the investing decisions might be for the stock picker. 

We can now take a quick look at some historical stock price index data. Spire Healthcare Group plc (LSE:SPI) presently has a 10 month price index of 0.55571. The price index is calculated by dividing the current share price by the share price ten months ago. A ratio over one indicates an increase in share price over the period. A ratio lower than one shows that the price has decreased over that time period.

Investors often closely follow fundamental and technical data. Even with all the evidence, it can be tough to determine if the economy and the markets are preparing for a whole new breakout run. With the recent trend resulting in a series of new all-time record highs, investors will have to put the pieces together to try and gauge how long the second longest bull market in history will continue. Some professionals are still wondering if the next recession is looming, and if a bear market is right around the corner. Investors commonly strive to locate the highest probability of success. The next goal may be to capitalize on what could become the most interesting part of the record bull market. Investors will most likely be concentrating on what has proven to work in the past, which may offer a better idea as to how successful the strategies will be heading into the second half of the year and beyond.

Spire Healthcare Group plc (LSE:SPI) has a current ERP5 Rank of 2332. The ERP5 Rank may assist investors with spotting companies that are undervalued. This ranking uses four ratios. These ratios are Earnings Yield, ROIC, Price to Book, and 5 year average ROIC. When looking at the ERP5 ranking, it is generally considered the lower the value, the better.



Looking at some alternate time periods, the 12 month price index is 0.49351, the 24 month is 0.39854, and the 36 month is 0.41068. Narrowing in a bit closer, the 5 month price index is 0.74268, the 3 month is 0.95820, and the 1 month is currently 1.13365.

Watching some historical volatility numbers on shares of Spire Healthcare Group plc (LSE:SPI), we can see that the 12 month volatility is presently 58.091900. The 6 month volatility is 59.838200, and the 3 month is spotted at 59.854000.

Key Ratios

Turning to some key ratios, Spire Healthcare Group plc (LSE:SPI)’s Leverage Ratio was recently noted as 0.289353. This ratio is calculated by dividing total debt by total assets plus total assets previous year, divided by two. The leverage of a company is relative to the amount of debt on the balance sheet. This ratio is often viewed as one measure of the financial health of a firm.

Spire Healthcare Group plc (LSE:SPI) presently has a current ratio of 1.44. The current ratio, also known as the working capital ratio, is a liquidity ratio that displays the proportion of current assets of a business relative to the current liabilities. The ratio is simply calculated by dividing current liabilities by current assets. The ratio may be used to provide an idea of the ability of a certain company to pay back its liabilities with assets. Typically, the higher the current ratio the better, as the company may be more capable of paying back its obligations.

The price to book ratio or market to book ratio for Spire Healthcare Group plc (LSE:SPI) currently stands at 0.458968.  The ratio is calculated by dividing the stock price per share by the book value per share.  This ratio is used to determine how the market values the equity.  A ratio of under 1 typically indicates that the shares are undervalued.  A ratio over 1 indicates that the market is willing to pay more for the shares.  There are often many underlying factors that come into play with the Price to Book ratio so all additional metrics should be considered as well. 

Ever wonder how investors predict positive share price momentum?  The Cross SMA 50/200, also known as the “Golden Cross” is the fifty day moving average divided by the two hundred day moving average.  The SMA 50/200 for Spire Healthcare Group plc (LSE:SPI) is currently 0.61277.  If the Golden Cross is greater than 1, then the 50 day moving average is above the 200 day moving average – indicating a positive share price momentum.  If the Golden Cross is less than 1, then the 50 day moving average is below the 200 day moving average, indicating that the price might drop.

C Score (Montier)

The C-Score is a system developed by James Montier that helps determine whether a company is involved in falsifying their financial statements. The C-Score is calculated by a variety of items, including a growing difference in net income verse cash flow, increasing days outstanding, growing days sales of inventory, increasing assets to sales, declines in depreciation, and high total asset growth. The C-Score of Spire Healthcare Group plc (LSE:SPI) is 3.00000. The score ranges on a scale of -1 to 6. If the score is -1, then there is not enough information to determine the C-Score. If the number is at zero (0) then there is no evidence of fraudulent book cooking, whereas a number of 6 indicates a high likelihood of fraudulent activity. The C-Score assists investors in assessing the likelihood of a company cheating in the books.

Investors often struggle with keeping their emotions in check when approaching the stock market. New investors can have a tendency to sell off winners too quick as well as hold onto losers for way too long. Some will argue that it is never a bad thing to take profits when they are on the table, but this can leave the investor with a large amount of regret if the stock continues to surge after selling. On the other end, investors may hold onto losers for way too long hoping for a bounce back. Holding out for better days can lead to even more exaggerated losses that can leave the investor with an even bigger feeling of regret. Battling to keep emotions separated from important investing decisions can be a big plus for investors over the long haul. Of course, this idea is easier to preach and much harder to follow.